Honesty is the best Brand Policy

Brand reputation and image

Whilst out shopping yesterday, I was attracted by a new chocolate bar (you will probably already know that I am an addict of new products as well as of chocolate!). It showed a picture of a piece of chocolate oozing with caramel, and with a nut in the middle. 

Now I should admit to also being a naive optimist who believes what is shown or written on the front of a pack, even though I have worked in marketing almost my whole career! But this purchase was a great example of how a product does not live up to its imagined brand policy.

The brand name even had toffee as its first word, so I (naively again?) assumed I would find toffee in it; wouldn’t you? Well, there was toffee – if you looked for it! – but the chocolate was dominated by the taste of the “confectioners’ cream” as it was called that in reality made up two-thirds of the filling.

You can imagine my disappointment, when I bit into the chocolate. Oh well, my fault I thought. I remember someone telling me years ago to “never believe what is pictured or highlighted on front of pack” especially for food products.

“Never believe what is pictured or highlighted on front of pack”

This company knew how popular caramel toffee is, but I suppose it is a more expensive ingredient than “confectioners’ cream”, so they limited one in favour of the other. Pity they didn’t do the same thing when picturing the product on the front of the pack!

 

Consumers demand authenticity, honesty, transparency

I thought we all knew and agreed to satisfy these demands. Whilst I am sure your advertising is abiding by the laws of your market, I wonder if they, as well as your other forms of communications, are also as honest as they should be.

Does your pack promise a product that looks or tastes much better, or is healthier than it is in reality? (I am thinking for example of all the 99% fat free claims here) If so, then you are setting yourself up to disappoint your consumers.

OK so they bought it, which is what you wanted, but wouldn’t you rather have repeat purchasers? And happy, contented consumers who will talk about your product to their family and friends, and recommend others to purchase it too?

 

Can your business grow without advocates?

If you think you can grow your brand in this social media dominated world, then I would love to hear from you. For the rest of us, it might just be worth taking another look at all our communications’ platforms, to ensure the message is authentic, honest and transparent. And that they build one on the other to form one coherent message for the brand.

 

Need help in improving your own brand building? Let us help you catalyse your customer centricity; check out our website and then contact us here: https://www.c3centricity.com/contact/

 

This post first appeared on C3Centricity Comments page in 2011

 C³Centricity uses images from Dreamstime.com

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Plugin Support By WordPress Plugins
Send this to a friend