March 2012 - c3centricity | c3centricity

+41 79 93 39 789 info@c3centricity.com

How to Turn your Br and Issue into a Competitive Advantage

Most companies have issues with their products at times. Usually they don’t correct them unless they are considered to be significant and could have a direct negative impact on sales.

You could argue that this will always be the case sooner or later, so better resolve them as soon as they are discovered. Some companies however are creative enough to turn what others might see as an issue into a competitive advantage. Let me give you a couple of examples.

 

Pringles Freshness Seal

Pringles pack
Bursting with Flavour
SOURCE: ZIGSPICS.COM

Most consumers associate bulging lids and packs with a product that has deteriorated in some way. This is not at all the case of Pringles, for which a bulging seal under the plastic cap is a sign of freshness apparently, or at least is a normal phenomenon.

What I love about the br and is that whereas in the past the seal’s surface was used for communicating promotions and competitions, it is now used to send a positive message to their consumers about this situation.

On a pack I recently bought the seal was printed with the words “Bursting with flavour”. How is that for making a positive out of what might have been perceived as a negative? I love it! It adds to the br and’s image and also to the taste and pleasure expectations for the consumer who is about to open the pack. I can imagine that this came directly out of consumer insights, to answer a query about why the seal was always bulging, which as I already mentioned would usually be associated with a product that had “gone off”.

 

The strange taste of Marmite

Another well documented example of a product that converted an issue to its advantage, is that of Unilever’s Marmite. Marmite claims to be a nutritious savoury spread, although non-Brits would describe it more as a very strange tasting concoction. Even UK consumers are divided in their opinion of it; they either love it or hate and there is apparently no half-way sentiment here.

Marmite created a very successful campaign around this love / hate relationship with the product which has now become a social phenomenon, and this divide has even been emphasised in their advertising and on the web. In the UK they even sell Marmite flavoured food – chocolate and cashew nuts – as well as br anded T Shirts, Kitchenware, Books, Cooking, Merch andise and more. How would you like your consumers to pay their hard earned money not only for your products, but for br anded promotional goods too?

In 2011, Unilever took the love / hate relationship into the kitchen, by developing and sharing simple recipes using Marmite for people who hate to cook. Each commercial of the campaign, called “Haute Cuisine, Love Marmite Recipes” ends with the “u” in Haute being blocked by a jar of Marmite, making “Hate Cuisine” and continuing the love / hate theme with which Marmite has become associated. If you would like to see some of the ads from the campaign, you can find them here and their website is www.marmite.co.uk .

These are just two examples but there are many more br ands that have turned a negative into a positive and made it an appealing competitive advantage. Does your br and have an issue and if so could you turn it into a strength? Do you have any other examples you can think of? I would love to hear about your ideas.

For more ideas on br anding check out our website: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/engage/

C³Centricity uses images from Dreamstime.com

Brands need to Cultivate Storytelling

Storytelling is a natural human behavior. In all cultures around the world, it has been used to convey learning and history, as well as to entertain children and adults alike. It has developed down through the ages for transferring knowledge long before books and now the web enabled their storage.  

Big brands and those that resonate with their customers, all have myths and stories built up about them. Do yours?

Stories of an iconic br and

When I worked for Philip Morris International, I first heard about this for the iconic Marlboro br and. At that time, it was rumored that Marlboro was financing the Ku Klux Klan in the US, because its packaging had three red rooftops or “K’s” on it. As this was certainly neither true nor desirable, the powers that be decided that we should remove one of the K’s by making the bottom of the pack solid red.

We thought that the rumours would then stop, as we saw them as negative for the br and. However, our consumers had the last say, because they then replaced the KKK rumour with one announcing that Marlboro hated blacks, Asians and Indians. This second story came about because a consumer had found the printer reference markings of coloured dots on the inside of the pack when he had dismantled it.

 

Customers tell stories about “their” brands

There are many myths about the greatest br ands around, coming from their packaging or communications in most cases. Toblerone is romoured to have the “Bear of Berne” and the Matterhorn exemplifying its Swiss origin on its pack, which also resembles the Matterhorn mountain. Camel is said to show the “Manneken Pis from Brussels” on the back leg of the camel of its pack, although I am not sure where that comment originated!

Other br ands develop stories through their communications, that are then shared and repeated by their customers. Examples of these include Columbia Outdoor wear’s “Tough Mother” campaign, Harley Davidson’s enabling “middle aged” men to become bikers at the weekend, or Dove’s campaign for real women to name just a few. All these stories emphasize the connection their customers have with these br ands, making them almost a part of their families through this emotional connection.

 

What stories are told about your brands?

What do your customers say and believe about your br ands? Rather than trying to correct them, unless of course they are clearly negative as was the case for Marlboro, continue to inflame them and more people will talk and share their proof that it is true. Someone said that there is no bad publicity; I am not sure about that, but it sure fires enthusiasm when people can share stories about their favorite br ands, and today’s ease of sharing through social media makes them arguably even more important.

One word of warning though; your br and has to live up to the story; Columbia’s wouldn’t have worked if their gear failed in the real world, nor Dove’s if they had moved to show women that looked too much like top models in their advertising.

Do you have any other stories about br ands you would like to share here? Do your own br ands have stories that customers tell each other? If not, then maybe your brand is not yet in the big league, or perhaps you will have to start a rumour of your own for them to share.

Social media is a great story-telling medium and you need to ensure that you post stories and information that are worth sharing, if you want to be considered a member of the family.

For more on br and building: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/engage/

This post is adapted from one that was first published on June 16th 2011 in C³Centricity Dimensions

C³Centricity uses images from Dreamstime.com

Time to Spring Clean your Market Research Toolbox

This week we are officially into Spring in Europe, so we all now start thinking about spring-cleaning the interiors of our houses and apartments. Of course living in Switzerl and, where people seem to be born with duster and brush in h and, I can imagine that there is not much work for most of my neighbours, but I have to admit that for my place it is a slightly different matter!

This is the reason why today I want to speak about YOUR interior, however I am not talking about your home, but about your Market Research Toolbox. When was the last time you took a look inside? Isn’t now an appropriate moment to review the tools you have in there? Some may be a few years old and need updating, whilst you may now notice that some others are missing that you really need. If this is the case, then this post will help you to do your toolbox spring clean.

In order to decide on all the tools you need, I suggest you start by taking a look at your br and essence. What do you want your br and to st and for in the hearts and minds of your target customers and your stakeholders? Who is your target customer; what attributes describe your product or service; what is your br and’s personality and character, and finally what benefits can your target customers expect from your br and? Once you have these identified, you need to agree what measures you will use to ensure that you follow them effectively and efficiently.

The 5Ps of marketing have been around long enough to assume that many people still find them to be useful, so we will base our review of your toolbox around these five topic areas, keeping your br and essence in mind of course.

Here are some questions I came up with, to help you to identify whether or not your toolbox needs some cleaning or updating:

People:

Who is your br and or service targeting? To underst and, you will need to gather representative data on your users, current, past and potential, and not just demographics, but as much information as you can gather about their habits, attitudes, preferences, values and motivations.

Price:

Are you pricing your br and based on cost or value? What do your current, past and potential customers value and what price estimate do they place on your offer? What are the psychological price barriers for your category and br and? Where is your price in comparison to your competitors’? If it is higher, what additional value are you offering to warrant the difference?

Promotion:

How effective are your communications? What tools do you have to help in their development and to test their performance; not just at the end before airing, but also early on in the process of their creation? What do your category users talk about online? Are you gathering information on and responding to these discussions? What promotions and rebates are you offering and what do your target customers think about them? What is their impact on purchase and loyalty? What is their ROI?

Place:

Where do your current and potential customers expect to find your br and? What is your level of distribution in these channels, as well as that of your competitors? Do you have out-of-stock? Where, when? What is the estimated sales loss due to a gain or loss in distribution? Are there new channels developing or others that are losing in popularity? Are you also selling online? Should you be?

Product:

How does your product or service perform in the market? What changes have been made to your own as well as to your competitors’ offers recently? What changes are important to make and which do your target customers value less? What are your customers’ pain points and how can they be reduced?

If you have information and answers to all of these questions, then your MR house is in order and I can only congratulate you. If not, then perhaps it is time to update your toolbox with newer, better tools.

Do you Spring clean your toolbox every year? If not, perhaps you should. The world is changing fast and what worked in the past, even just a year ago, may need to be tweaked or replaced today.

For more on identifying KPI’s and performance metrics please check out our website here: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/underst and/

What changes have you identified as being needed in your own toolbox? It would be great to compare our spring cleaning efforts!

If you need help in running your own Market Research Toolbox review, C3Centricity offers a 1-DayCatalyst intensive but fun session, working with your team to identify priorities & necessary changes in your processes. Contact us here for an informal chat about it.

C³Centricity uses images from Dreamstime.com

STOP Emotional Innovation!

Last week, I posted about making innovations more emotional; if you didn’t see it, you can find it here. Today, I want to speak about the other side of emotional innovation; how to STOP some of your own emotions, when launching new products.

One Sunday last Summer I had been planning a lie-in, like most of us do when we don’t have to get up for work at the weekends. However, I was woken up very early by one of my cats who came to proudly show me that she had caught a bat! 

Both my cats love hunting and I have to say they are (too) good at it! They give me frequent “presents” that I discretely dispose of, unless of course they are alive, in which case I have to catch them and return them to the wild outdoors, whilst the two of them continue to sniff around the last place in which they had seen their prey.

Anyway, my cat Apricot – a female ginger – was really excited about her very rare capture, which is why she had woken me up to show me. Of course, I was less than enthusiastic about a bat flying around my bedroom at five in the morning! Luckily when I switched on my bedside lamp, the light quietened it down and when he stopped flying, to hang on the wall, I was able to catch him and put him back outside where be belonged.

 

Do your innovations excite you or your customer?

Now awake, my mind started musing on the very large differences in the reactions of my cat and me, to this event. She was excited, happy and proud; I was surprised, disappointed and irritated that I had to stop what I was doing – sleeping – to attend to her “present”.

I think something similar happens sometimes when companies launch new products or services. Everyone in the organisation gets excited about their innovation or renovation, are proud to have developed it and happy that after all the hard word, it is finally ready for launch. The customer on the other h and, can be surprised, which is great if this is accompanied by pleasure, or disappointed if the promise is not delivered. However, he might also be irritated if his usual br and or version has been replaced and is no longer available, or at least no longer on the shelf or store in which he usually finds it. We are in fact asking him to work, to change his habits, which no human being really enjoys, even when it is for the better.

 

5 Questions for winning innovations

So how can you make your new product development more customer-centric? By starting from your target customers’ perspective, and by answering these five questions:

  1. How are your customers currently using your product or service? What are their pain points if any; price, packaging, size, availability, sensorial experience – taste, aroma, colour, sound, feel?
  2. Who is currently changing or has already changed their habits to compensate for these pain points? Your current regular users, occasional users, lapsed users, competitive br and users?
  3. What are your current customers doing to face their pain points? Are they only buying on promotion, buying several small packs at a time, buying a replacement br and, buying elsewhere, adding their own ingredients?
  4. Where would they rank each of the identified pain points in terms of priority and acceptability? Can they cope with buying less often to get it at a cheaper price? Do they have a “portfolio” of acceptable br ands from which to choose in the category? Do they transfer your product into another container for ease of serving?
  5. When do the pain points become so unacceptable that your customers would consider changing br ands or adapting their behaviour? Are there psychological price barriers in the category or for your br and? Are there category st andards of colour, size or packaging that need to be obeyed – or perhaps even broken?

Obviously best-in-class innovation and renovation starts with the target customer in mind; their rational needs AND emotional desires.

Based on the answers to these five questions, the most relevant products and services can be proposed and are then more likely to be met with positive excitement, pride and happiness, rather than negative surprise, disapointment, irritation and frustration.

 

Involve your customers in your innovation

A further idea about customer-centric innovation is to actually involve your customers along the whole process. Many organisations now run what are called “co-creation” or “co-elaboration” sessions, where ideas are shared with and then further developed with customers in live sessions, either in person or over the web. How about co-creating your next new product idea with your customers? That way you know it will delight them even before you launch.

Do you have any other points you would add to the above list? Have you had success in co-creating a product or new service recently? Please share your experiences, I would love to hear about them.

This post first appeared on April 28th 2011 in C3Centricity Comments

More information on improving your innovation and conducting co-creation sessions can be found here: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/vision/

C³Centricity uses images from Dreamstime.com

What do Martin Luther King and Apple have in common?

To paraphrase the great Martin Luther King’s famous speech: I have a dream that one day this world will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all products are created equal.”

Inspiring words indeed, but unfortunately, when it comes to innovation, successful new products are rarely created equal. Why then did I find my inspiration for this post in them? Because I believe that the main reason many new products don’t sell as expected is because they are sold as such – as just new products!

Today’s consumer has so much choice that product benefits on their own rarely sell. Consumers dem and so much more. They ask that they are in fact sold a dream! An inspiration to a better world for them and their families.

Does Apple sell just a computer, an MP3 player, a mobile phone? No, they sell creativity, excitement and individualism. I am not criticising their products, they are of course fantastic, but rather showing that even if their products are arguably better than their competitors, they are selling them emotionally. They have found a way to build excitement, longing and love into each of them. They have enabled each and every consumer to feel special, privileged, an individual. And in this mass market world that we live in, this is certainly something that we all desire, dare I say crave?.

So what can we learn from Martin Luther King and Apple in launching new products that will sell? Many things I am sure, but here are the first three that came to me:

  1. Inspire a dream – why will your consumer’s life be better with your product or service, emotionally not just rationally. Describe and picture their future with your product or service in it.
  2. Build emotion – make consumers excited by the launch; build anticipation, make the wait a part of the sell, so that they will be lining up to buy it
  3. Provide individualism – make consumers feel privileged to have bought it, whether this is through great after-sales service, automatic club membership, personalised offers or limited editions; even limiting distribution can work, although this needs to be done very cautiously, as it can have the opposite effect and disappoint rather than inflame the longing

With so many new product failures today – I have heard anything from 80% to 95% – consumers have become blasé about them. They know that if they are not immediately satisfied, there are many more out there on the market to try. Building loyalty comes from connecting with your consumer on an emotional level, so that there is no comparison to competitive products and services, even if they are in reality very similar at a rational level.

What other keys do you see for new product launch succcess today? What would you add to my starter for three? Do you have your own list? Please let me know if I have “inspired you emotionally as an individual” to comment here.

For more ideas on successful innovation, please check out our website here: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/vision/

C³Centricity uses images from Dreamstime.com

Delivering a Campaign Win Amidst Online Saturation

Fifty years ago, the primary platforms used to communicate to customers were print media, TV commercials, and billboards. Given this, large-scale campaigns were pricey, and only a h andful of major br ands had the resources with which to execute them.

Now flash forward. These days, the results of corporate marketing initiatives are as ubiquitous as the air we breathe. As marketers, we still have the commercials, billboards, and print ads to content with, but now we also have to consider things like search engines, social media, and mobile computing. Beyond that, we must deal with the knowledge that just about anyone with a computer and an internet connection now has the capability to market a product or service online, quickly and inexpensively. The issue becomes:

Your customer is st anding in front of a fire hose, but are YOU the one getting them wet?

Every time your customer is hit with a new pop-up, banner ad, or promoted tweet, they become more and more desensitized. They’re getting bombarded with endless potato chips, when what they really want is a substantial meal.  Do you know how to feed them?

Content is the value

In an information-driven market, the companies that will prevail are the ones that underst and the type of information their customers must receive in order to justify their investment in a relationship. Just showing up and spouting what you want them to know about your offering doesn’t do the job anymore. Rattling on about features and benefits will put them to sleep—or worse, yet, make them click away.

Demystifying customer needs

The easiest way to give customers what they need is simply to hear what they’re saying. Have you listened to your customers lately?

  1. Discover relevant online destinations. Set up keyword searches to deliver information on the blogs, web sites, and social media outlets you need to monitor. Actively listen to the online chatter about your br and, industry, and competitors.
  2. Solicit direct feedback. Develop and share an online survey with your customers, giving them an anonymous way to tell you what they think— and what they want.
  3. Identify conversation trends. As you review the information you’ve gathered, you’ll probably be able to identify a number of recurring issues that appear to be the most important to your customers. Turn these into a set of key customer statements (e.g., “I need to stop wasting money on service bundles I cannot use,” “I want to spend less time managing my IT infrastructure.”).
  4. Turn customer statements into marketing messaging. Develop the pillars of your messaging framework around your customer statements (e.g., “We provide all the services you need, and none of the ones you don’t,” “Our products reduce your IT maintenance time by 65%.”), and then spin them further into marketing copy:

Are you tired of paying for service bundles filled with offerings you can’t use?
XYZ Company provides custom solutions that target your unique needs—without a lot of extras you don’t want. . .

Are you spending too much time managing your IT infrastructure?
XYZ Company can cut the amount of time you spend on IT administration by 65%, so you can focus on building your bottom line. . .

Campaigns based upon actual online conversations will resonate keenly with customers because you are repeating to them exactly what they told you. Your content will capture their attention because you are telling them that you recognize what they need, and that you are able to deliver it.

For more information on connecting with customers, please check out our website: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/engage/

 

Is New Marketing Experience or Engagement?

An article by Jacob Baude in FastCo last week (read it here) got me thinking about how marketing has changed in the last few years.

Until recently, everyone seemed to be talking about engagement and how we needed to entertain our customers, especially on social media and br and platforms. Now it seems to be that customer experience, which of course includes the web, is what really matters. In my opinion, I think marketing hasn’t really changed at all, as it is still about giving the customer what he wants.

One of the basic rules of business success is to be available wherever and whenever your customer wants to buy, ideally at a price he can both afford and thinks provides him with great value for money. Simple. So what is all this talk about experience and engagement? Let me give you my perspective, but I would love to hear yours.

Engagement

Ever since the web has fascinated us with the opportunity of connecting with potential customers worldwide, companies have tried to leverage it for their br ands. All major br ands now have their own website, if not several, with separate ones for each of their variants, promotions and events. I remember doing an analysis of a client’s websites and finding that 90% of them had less than 20 visitors a month! Think about it. Would a br and manager normally be able to advertise to only 20 customers? Of course not; advertising ROI is calculated in OTS (opportunities to see) and there are usually minimums set for the chosen media to be approved.

So how come organisations are spending thous ands if not millions on developing websites for 20 people? In most cases because they are answering to their egos and not to the customers’ need for engagement.

When developing a website, it therefore makes sense to underst and why you are doing it. What is your customer interested in learning, not what you want to tell him. What excites, fascinates or surprises your customer about your br and or segment? Is there something he would like to know or share with his fellow category users? Is he looking for information or entertainment, or both? Answers to these questions will help you to identify whether or not your br and needs a website and what should be included in it. Of course, it also assumes that you know your customer deeply, but that is another story. (see our posts on targeting for help on that topic!)

Experience

The article I mentioned earlier refers to the five major types of experience that form the basic building blocks of the experiential code set. They include “sensations” or poly-sensoriality, which Martin Lindstrom made famous with his book Br and Sense, which was published already more than 7 years ago! Apart from a few scratch stickers for smelling the perfume of some products and a h andful of food companies making a few r andom new product gestures to stimulate more of our senses, it’s a pity that it didn’t strike a chord with more marketers.

I think this is a real lost opportunity, if only from my own personal, single consumer perspective. Aren’t poly-sensual products more fun? Isn’t that what a great experience is all about? Being satisfied with the product or service purchased? Feeling that it was worth its price; that we get pleasure every time we use or consume it? Hopefully modern cognitive science has indeed given us the keys to the kingdom by revealing how our brains use physical experiences to make sense of everything, and hopefully marketers will now be ready to incorporate it into the way they satisfy people’s needs and desires.

After all, in the end, it is what we as marketers are basically selling, an engaging experience. One that delights, surprises (positively) and brings enjoyment. If all of these can be made bigger and better by adding more sensations or the other experience types Baude refers to in his post, then I for one will only be happier. Won’t you be too?

Find more ideas about innovation and how to better satisfy your customers on our website: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/vision/

C³Centricity uses images from Dreamstime.com

When Did You Last Really Delight Someone?

Now just to be clear, I am not talking about your spouse or significant other, whom I assume you delight every day! I’m talking about your customers, consumers or clients; the ones whose satisfaction and delight makes your business grow. 

An article last year on Forbes Blogs detailed a discussion with Amex EVP of World Service Jim Bush, where he was quoted as saying “we have been taking them (customer service personnel) off the clock and tossing out the old, robotic scripts”.

He also mentioned that “we believe that great service is about what the customer thinks after every interaction”.

 

Delight or Delete

Did you know that if a customer contacts a service centre and is dissatisfied with the response they get, they are more than twice as likely to not repurchase your product or service as someone who had a complaint but did not contact the care centre? Customers who reach out to a company to complain, become fervent detractors if not satisfied by the response they get.

If they have taken the time to call, you need to do everything possible, not only to respond to their needs, but also to surprise and delight them, by “going the extra mile”, going beyond what they had expected, to solve their problem or answer their query. In this way they then become advocates and will share their experience with friends, family and even strangers over the Internet these days.

 

A personal example of ABCD Service

At the end of last year, I tested a few companies’ customer care services as I did online purchasing of my Christmas presents. One company’s products were delivered by the post office to the wrong address (an empty house) and when eventually found, the package had been completely ruined by the rain and snow.

I called the company, even though it was not directly their fault; they not only replaced the damaged goods, but sent them by first class post to ensure I got the parcel in time for Christmas. Now that is service ABCD (above and beyond the call of duty!) the story of which I happily shared with everyone over the festive season. You can be sure that I will use their services again and choose them over other suppliers in the future.

 

What more can you do for your Customers?

I wish more companies would start thinking like Jim Bush and treat every single customer as vital to the success of their business. Whenever a customer contacts you, by whatever medium and for whatever reason, you have a unique chance to engage one-to-one with them on their terms, and to surprise and delight them.

How are your own customer services personnel trained? Do they have a script to which the must adhere and targets of time or cost limitations to respond to each contact?

Here are some ideas on how to improve your Customers’ experience when they reach out to you:

  • Start by thanking the customer for having taken the time to call or write
  • Listen to everything the customer has to say before responding
  • Solve the issue if possible, or say how you are going to get it resolved, by whom and in what timeframe
  • Ask if there is anything else that the customer would like to ask or share
  • Then and only then may you invite the customer to respond to any questions that you would like to ask, if relevant, but keep it short
Please share this post with all your friends and colleagues; the more people that know how to do customer service right, the better we all will be!
Do you have any ideas on what other things you can do to turn your customers into advocates? If so please share here.

For more ideas on how to improve your company’s connection with your customers, check out our website for more ideas: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/engage/

This post was originally published September 27th 2011 on C3Centricity Dimensions

C³Centricity sources images from Dreamstime.com

5 Steps from Market Research to Insight

How often do you attend a market research presentation at which the agency conducting the fieldwork makes a number of recommendations, which are then discussed? Every time I hope; if not, then perhaps you need to consider changing your agency.

Quite often a number of possible actions are discussed and the agency then leaves considering their job to be done; and everyone else goes back to their “day jobs”.

Caught up in the problems and opportunities of the daily routine, new findings or ideas are quite often quickly forgotten until the next need for information arises. Many companies regularly promote employees doing a good job, and no group seems to get more changes, more often, than the marketing teams. The problem with this is that every new br and manager or category director starts by asking some usually very valid questions about the market, the target customer, or the competition. The answer to such questions is then to run a market research study; and although the MR team hopefully mentions that a similar project was done in the recent past, the new marketing person will often claim that their needs are different or that the market has changed since their predecessor ordered the study, so a new one needs to be run.

Now this might be very true, but unfortunately in most cases, it is not. The market and its customers generally change much more slowly than marketing would like to believe or hopes. They believe that any positive changes have come from their (very recent) actions and not from previous work carried out before they arrived. Particularly when it comes to br and image and equity, changes are in general slow despite the promotions and communications planned over the year.

How do you stop this vicious circle of information gathering followed by inaction? How about starting with the end “in sight”?

#1. Defining the what and why

The business has a question about what is happening in the market or why. Rather than immediately briefing the market research group for a new piece of research, how about inviting them to run a workshop? Ask them to invite a number of people from different areas of the problem or opportunity identified. These might be from production, supply chain, sales, distribution, finance, operations, packaging or product development, in addition to marketing and insight teams. The objective is to get a team of people together with very different perspectives to set the framework of the question.

#2. Underst anding the what and why

When this group first meet, they should come prepared to talk about what facts and ideas they have about the topic, which should have already been pre-defined and mentioned in the invite. Ideally they should also have all had the chance to meet and spend time with the target customers in an appropriate environment and situation, relevant to the problem or opportunity previously identified. This will provide all participants with the most up-to-date view of current customer behaviour and opinions, which will serve as a precious background to the discussions held during the first workshop.

#3. Completing the information

Once all participants have had the chance to discuss the different pieces of information and perspectives, the market research and insight team should identify whether or not there is a need for further information before they start insight development. If this is the case, they agree with marketing what is needed and then conduct the information gathering in the most appropriate way.

#4. Developing the insight

The results of the additional information gathering are shared during another workshop and then the insight development process can start in earnest. Again the same participants as in the first workshop should be present, to continue to bring together all elements that might impact the deep insight development process.

#5. Identifying the actions

The final phase, which can often be completed in the same workshop as the insight development process, is the identification of appropriate actions. Having all interested parties discussing possible actions and agreeing on the most appropriate ones, ensures not only that they actually take place, but also that they are performed in a timely manner.

This may sound like a long-winded process, but I have seen it done in less than a day when the information was readily available, and within a couple of weeks when new information was gathered over the web. These group meetings are much more likely to deliver insight and actions than most other processes, as there is an agreed team responsibility.

Do you have a question or challenge about developing insights from information and knowledge? I am sure I can help; just contact me here and I’ll respond personally.

For more on Insight development, check out our website here: https://www.c3centricity.com/home/underst and/

How do you turn information into insight and then into appropriate actions in the shortest and most efficient way? I would love to hear about your own winning processes.

C³Centricity sources images from Dreamstime.com

FREE DOWNLOAD “Secrets to Brand Building”

Everything You Need To Know To Improve Your Marketing & Brand Building

* indicates required